ESSSB19

First Day Sessions

Wednesday, 24/08/2022

MORNING SESSIONS

8:00 am - 10:00 am

Suicide prevention for boys and men (IASP SIG)

Network meeting of the Special Interest Group for Suicide Prevention in boys and men. All interested are welcome!

8:00 am - 10:00 am

Exploring the connection between alcohol, self-harm and suicide

Role of alcohol in pesticide self-poisoning: a scoping review
Dr Lisa Schölin, University of Edinburgh

Alcohol, self-harm and community interventions in Sri Lanka
Prof Thilini Rajapakse, University of Peradeniya

The link between ACEs and suicidal behaviour among young in Greenland
Dr Christina Viskum Larsen, University of Southern Denmark

Panel discussion chair:
Prof Flemming Konradsen, University of Copenhagen

8:00 am - 10:00 am

IASP National/Regional Strategies European Region (part 1)

This regional workshop will address specific aspects of network connectiveness that could potentially lead to the development of inter country support systems with the prime purpose of developing, implementing and evaluating national suicide prevention activities, programmes and/or strategies.

The primary focus of this workshop is to explore:
• potential collaborative pathways that cross national boundaries and gain insight and knowledge in the planning and implementation of effective suicide prevention programmes;
• the provision of guidance (knowledge, skills and experience) to countries in developing such implementation and evaluation national suicide prevention programmes.

This workshop will provide a platform for countries primarily within the two IASP Regions (European Region and Eastern Mediterranean Region) to present on their progress of existing national suicide prevention activities and future plans for national programmes that are currently under development. The workshop though is open to all participants from all regions. The purpose is to provide a range of relevant feedback from a diverse source of professional knowledge so that countries can benefit from exchange of expertise within and across regions.

8:00 am - 10:00 am

International use of CAMS: An overview and cultural considerations (part 1)

International Use of CAMS: An Overview and Cultural Considerations

David A. Jobes1, Bent Rosenbaum2 Remco de Winter3 Paulius Skruibis4 , Tone Bovim5, Zaffer Iqbal6
The Catholic University of America, Washington DC USA1, Private Practice, Copenhagen, Denmakr2, Vrije University, Amsterdam, Netherlands3 , Private Practice, Vilnius, Lithuania4, Regional Centre for Trauma and Suicide Prevention Health Region East, Oslo, Norway5 , Psychological Services, NAViGO CiC, Grimsby, United Kingdom6

Introduction: This two-part pre-conference workshop will provide an initial broad overview of CAMS and introduce various research projects, its application, clinical use, and its adaptation in various European countries. David Jobes will provide an initial overview to CAMS and its use abroad and then moderate the two panel presentation of European experts describing their experiences and perspectives within their own countries.
Aim: The aim of this preconference workshop is to show various developments of this evidence based intervention across several European countries. Special consideration will be given to cultural considerations and adaptations that may be needed to successfully provide the intervention.
Methods: Two panels will provide perspectives on CAMS research, training, and its clinical use in their
respective countries. Panel 1 will feature presentations by Bent Rosenbaum (Denmark), Remco de Winter
(Netherlands), and Paulius Skruibis (Lithuania). Panel 2 will feature presentations by Tone Bovim (Norway)
and Zaffer Iqbal (United Kingdom). These presentations will be followed by a general discussion of all
workshop panellists before a larger discussion and questions and answers with audience members.
Results: CAMS is one of the few suicide-focused clinical interventions to have empirical support from several clinical trials among European investigators. Its use and training varies from country to country. How to maintain adherence to the model while scaling up its use is a general consideration related to systems of care, costs of training, and other reality-based constraints. While CAMS is used effectively by providers abroad, there are some limits and constraints using it across different cultures. While CAMS is meant to be flexible and adaptive, we will consider some cultural and translational considerations that may impact its use and effectiveness.
Conclusion: No clinical intervention will be effective with every patient across every setting around the world. However, CAMS has seen some measure of success in being used across cultures with supportive research and training in various parts of the world. Successes and limitations will thus be discussed as to how to expand the use of any evidence-based clinical approach to meet the needs of patients suffering with suicidal thoughts, feelings, and behaviours.

8:00 am - 10:00 am

The future of suicide research is collaborative, credible, and accessible

The future of suicide research is collaborative, credible, and accessible
Kirtley, O. J.1, Janssens, J. J.1, Kaurin, A.2
1Center for Contextual Psychiatry, KU Leuven, Belgium; 2Faculty of Health/School of Psychology and Psychiatry, Witten/Herdecke University

Science is undergoing a ‘credibility revolution’. As part of this, researchers are encouraged to work according to a set of practices, sometimes called “open science” practices, which are designed to increase transparency, reproducibility, and replicability of research. Importantly, as well as being good for the field and wider scientific community, these practices can also be of direct benefit to researchers. For example, sharing data and materials can increase collaboration, preprinting papers ahead of publication enables researchers to demonstrate output at a much earlier stage of the research process, and publishing studies as Registered Reports can reduce publication bias. Although more and more researchers in the suicide and self-injury field are embracing open science practices, starting out in open science can be challenging. There are also misconceptions about open science practices, which create barriers to their use in suicide research.

In this workshop, we will provide a gentle introduction to what open science practices are and why we need them, as well as busting some of the myths that prevent researchers from using these practices in their own research. We will give an overview of key open science practices, including preprinting; pre- and post-registration of studies; sharing code, study materials, and data; and the Registered Reports article format. Attendees will also have the opportunity to get hands-on experience of working with the Open Science Framework, a free software platform that facilitates use of open science practices. The workshop leaders are researchers at three different career stages, all of whom are highly experienced in implementing open science practices in their own published work within the suicide and self-injury field.

The workshop is open to researchers from all areas within the suicide and self-injury research field — not only psychologists — and to researchers at all career stages, from masters students to principal investigators. No prior experience with open science practices is necessary to participate in the workshop. Attendees will require a laptop.

8:00 am - 9:00 am

Prevention of railway suicides

Approximately 5% of all suicides occur by railway, equivalent to 3,000 deaths every year in Europe. Previous strategies for prevention of railway suicides include: instalment of platform doors, soothing blue lights, suicide pits, encouragement for help-seeking, gatekeeper training, public campaigns, and fencing/physical barriers. The level of evidence is relatively meagre for other types of intervention than platform doors, which is not a feasible solution at all railway stations.

The international network, Trespass and Suicide Prevention Network, is open for researchers interessted in suicide prevention. The group also maintains the REST-RAIL website.

The meeting at the ESSSB is intented as a network meeting where on-going efforts of different groups are presented. All interested are welcome!

8:00 am - 10:00 am

Safe messaging: Teaching Responsible Suicide Reporting to Journalists and Communication Specialists

Workshop: Safe messaging: Teaching Responsible Suicide Reporting to Journalists and Communication Specialists

Suicide deaths are news. According to research by Duncan and Luce (2020), 41.5 percent of suicide stories in UK regional and national news outlets were based on coverage of coroners’ inquests and other legal proceedings; 34.6 percent were event driven i.e. the first report of the suicide; 15.1 percent were tributes to the deceased; 7.5 percent were stories about positive actions in memory of the deceased e.g. fund-raising, and 1.3 percent were stories that marked the anniversary of the death. Frequent coverage of sensitive topics, such as suicide, suggests proper training is important, as mindful reporting can positively impact on public understanding of suicide (Hawton & Williams, 2001; Luce, 2019; Skehan et al, 2009). However, understanding advice from media reporting guidelines supplied by Samaritans, the World Health Organisa¬tion, the Society for Professional Journalists and the National Union of Journalists, amongst others, as well as regulatory bodies like the Independ¬ent Press Standards Organisation (IPSO) and OFCOM is potentially overwhelming, especially for those whose awareness–with good reason–may be no more than an academic lecture presented as part of an undergraduate programme, or a brief chat over the watercooler in the newsroom/communications office.

It is important to recognize the difficulties journalists encounter through their news-work that can affect their ability to fully engage with suicide reporting guidelines, e.g. the 24/7 news cycle, working across platforms, persistent social media engagement and analytics, fluctuating employment terms and conditions, burnout and stress. It’s also important to recognize the challenges communication specialists have when they work with journalists on suicide stories.

To help combat this, and to help journalists use suicide reporting guidelines more, we devised the Responsible Suicide Reporting (RSR) model (Duncan & Luce, 2020), which has ethical storytelling at its core. The RSR model is made up of five narrative types, four ethical rules and a standard of moderation; it embeds media reporting guidelines within journalistic practices, thus enabling journalists/journalism students/communication specialists to make ethical decisions as they produce content. Hence, we combine storytelling and ethical reporting functions within one model.

Using a problem-based learning (PBL) approach (Burns, 1999; Meadows, 1997; Wright, 2012), this workshop will focus on media trauma literacy and safe messaging using the RSR model for journalists, journalism educators and communication specialists. The session will be led by two journalists-turned-academics who have decades of experience working in journalism and covering suicide stories themselves. The session will be hands on and will construct and deconstruct suicide stories from the perspective of journalists. The session will provide insight into the production processes of journalists. Communication specialists will also learn how to work better with journalists when working on suicide stories so that they can be confident the journalism pieces are ethical and responsible. We will also introduce participants to the Suicide Reporting Toolkit: www.suicidereportingtoolkit.com

The session has been successfully run with 80 journalists and communication specialists in the USA , as well as a further 100 professionals in the UK over the last 6 months.

This session will be relevant to those with an interest in media coverage of suicide, those working with journalists on suicide stories, those who are interviewed about suicide for regional/national/international media and those with lived experience.

By the end of the session participants should feel more confident in engaging with journalists. Participants will also have a better understanding of news production processes and have some insight into where future research needs to focus. There will be ample time for questions and open discussion.

The workshop will cover:

  1. Basic overview of Journalism
    a. What is news?
    b. Sourcing & Intros
    c. Inverted Pyramid
    d. Constructing the story & story elements
    e. Stigma and Language in communication about suicide

  2. What is Responsible Suicide Reporting? (RSR Model)
    a. Identify the type of suicide stories that exist
    b. Apply 4 Ethical Rules
    c. Apply Standard of Moderation

  3. How do we write/produce responsible suicide stories?
    a. Deconstruct suicide stories
    b. Write your own suicide story

  4. Questions

9:00 am - 10:00 am

Suicide Prevention in the Workplace: network meeting

Approximately 5% of all suicides occur by railway, equivalent to 3,000 deaths every year in Europe. Systematic reviews suggest that platform doors may be one of the most effective measures for preventing railway suicides. Yet, this might be challenging to implement on stations frequented by train sets of various lengths and door positions. Several other efforts have been suggested but there is limited evidence regarding their effectiveness.

It is obvious that a stronger collaboration between groups working in different countries will improv ethe exchange of experiences.

This meeting is a network meeting for practitioners and researchers interested in prevention of railway suicides. There will be a short presentation of on-going efforts in several countries and general information regarding existing networks and resources, such as RESTRAIL.

All interested are welcome.

9:00 am - 10:00 am

Postvention: support for people who have been bereaved by suicide (SIG)

Postvention: support for people who have been bereaved by suicide (IASP Special Interest Group)

The purpose of the meeting is to offer a platform for researchers and everyone involved in the field of postvention and suicide bereavement support, and delegates will have the opportunity to provide updates to the group on recent progress in postvention, with regards to practice, policy and research, in their country.
The meeting will explore:
-potential collaborations and mutual projects that can be carried out through the international network of the SIG.
-how SIG-activities can be supportive and beneficial for local/national postvention (e.g., through sharing of knowledge, resources, evaluation, etc.).

Chairs:

Prof. Dr. phil. Birgit Wagner
MSB Medical School Berlin
Berlin, Germany

Dr Karl Andriessen, PhD
The University of Melbourne,
Melbourne, VIC, Australia

9:30 am - 10:00 am

LIVED EXPERIENCES: Reducing stigma related to mental illness – highlights from the Danish anti-stigma program ‚ONE OF US‘

The purpose of ONE OF US is to reduce stigma related to mental illness in Denmark and the vision is a society with no more discrimination and exclusion based on mental illness. ONE OF US is a national program based in the Danish Health Authority regionally rooted in the psychiatric information units (PsykInfo) within the five target areas: Service users and relatives; professionals in the health and social sectors; young people; the labour market; the public and the media. The presentation will give examples of highlights from the program and an ambassador will share their personal experience with stigma, suicidal ideation and a suicide attempt.

Anja Kare Vedelsby, ONE OF US, Health Promotion and Inequality, Danish Health Authority, Denmark

Sidonia Tabitha Waco, Ambassador in ONE OF US

MORNING COFFEE BREAK

9:30 am - 10:00 am

IASR Advanced Workshop on Meta-analysis

This is an advanced workshop on how to conduct metanalyses

Lecturer: Prof. Stefan Lucht from Germany
Topics:

  • General lecture about meta-analysis with focus on suiciidology
  • Hands on exercise with RevMan (a software which is free to use for everybody)
  • Specific topics: publication bias, risk of bias
  • Question and answer session on ongoing projects

Chair: Gil Zalsman, IASR

10:30 am - 12:00 pm

IASP National/Regional Strategies European Region (part 2)

This regional workshop will address specific aspects of network connectiveness that could potentially lead to the development of inter country support systems with the prime purpose of developing, implementing and evaluating national suicide prevention activities, programmes and/or strategies.

The primary focus of this workshop is to explore:
• potential collaborative pathways that cross national boundaries and gain insight and knowledge in the planning and implementation of effective suicide prevention programmes;
• the provision of guidance (knowledge, skills and experience) to countries in developing such implementation and evaluation national suicide prevention programmes.

This workshop will provide a platform for countries primarily within the two IASP Regions (European Region and Eastern Mediterranean Region) to present on their progress of existing national suicide prevention activities and future plans for national programmes that are currently under development. The workshop though is open to all participants from all regions. The purpose is to provide a range of relevant feedback from a diverse source of professional knowledge so that countries can benefit from exchange of expertise within and across regions.

10:30 am - 12:00 am

Commercial interests in suicide prevention – what can we learn from other public health issues?

Conceptualizing the commerical determinants of suicide broadening the lens on suicide and self-harm prevention
Dr Duleeka Knipe, University of Bristol &
Dr May van Schalkwyk, LSHTM

Initiatives to reduce suicides involvling analgesics
Prof Keith Hawton, University of Oxford

Firearms and the firearm industry
Dr Nason Maani, LSHTM

Enhancing governance for suicide prevention: Towards managing conflict of interest
Prof Jeff Collin, University of Edinburgh

10:30 am - 12:00 pm

International use of CAMS: An overview and cultural considerations (part 2)

International Use of CAMS: An Overview and Cultural Considerations

David A. Jobes1, Bent Rosenbaum2 Remco de Winter3 Paulius Skruibis4 , Tone Bovim5, Zaffer Iqbal6
The Catholic University of America, Washington DC USA1, Private Practice, Copenhagen, Denmakr2, Vrije University, Amsterdam, Netherlands3 , Private Practice, Vilnius, Lithuania4, Regional Centre for Trauma and Suicide Prevention Health Region East, Oslo, Norway5 , Psychological Services, NAViGO CiC, Grimsby, United Kingdom6

Introduction: This two-part pre-conference workshop will provide an initial broad overview of CAMS and introduce various research projects, its application, clinical use, and its adaptation in various European countries. David Jobes will provide an initial overview to CAMS and its use abroad and then moderate the two panel presentation of European experts describing their experiences and perspectives within their own countries.
Aim: The aim of this preconference workshop is to show various developments of this evidence based intervention across several European countries. Special consideration will be given to cultural considerations and adaptations that may be needed to successfully provide the intervention.
Methods: Two panels will provide perspectives on CAMS research, training, and its clinical use in their
respective countries. Panel 1 will feature presentations by Bent Rosenbaum (Denmark), Remco de Winter
(Netherlands), and Paulius Skruibis (Lithuania). Panel 2 will feature presentations by Tone Bovim (Norway)
and Zaffer Iqbal (United Kingdom). These presentations will be followed by a general discussion of all
workshop panellists before a larger discussion and questions and answers with audience members.
Results: CAMS is one of the few suicide-focused clinical interventions to have empirical support from several clinical trials among European investigators. Its use and training varies from country to country. How to maintain adherence to the model while scaling up its use is a general consideration related to systems of care, costs of training, and other reality-based constraints. While CAMS is used effectively by providers abroad, there are some limits and constraints using it across different cultures. While CAMS is meant to be flexible and adaptive, we will consider some cultural and translational considerations that may impact its use and effectiveness.
Conclusion: No clinical intervention will be effective with every patient across every setting around the world. However, CAMS has seen some measure of success in being used across cultures with supportive research and training in various parts of the world. Successes and limitations will thus be discussed as to how to expand the use of any evidence-based clinical approach to meet the needs of patients suffering with suicidal thoughts, feelings, and behaviours.

10:30 am - 12:00 pm

Understanding frequent callers to suicide prevention helplines and techniques to better help them

Introduction: Helplines worldwide have a small proportion of clients who call quite often. Research shows that counselors may experience “emotional drain” and feel that their calls are difficult, and question the usefulness of the help provided.
Aims: 1) to better understand the nature of frequent callers to suicide prevention helplines; 2) to understand how to better help them, based upon recent empirical research; 3) to experience in role plays recommended intervention methods
Methods: We first present results from three studies of telephone interventions with frequent callers, and a comprehensive literature review. We discuss implications of the findings for practice. Then, role-play activities will demonstrate recommended intervention techniques.
The three complementary studies analysed complete audio recordings of calls from all 105 frequent callers (>30 calls/month) during one month to the U.S. National Suicide Prevention Lifeline network. Trained research assistants reliably assessed characteristics of their first and last calls during the month. We related caller and helper call characteristics to positive changes and callers’ appreciation in post call surveys of help received, and we conducted qualitative assessments of all the 318 calls from a random sample of 24.
Results: Frequent callers are a heterogeneous group with multiple and diverse serious chronic problems, including suicidal behaviors. Counsellors generally focused on short-term solutions to problems, and rarely on the person, their strengths and feelings. Counselor techniques associated with more positive outcomes and greater caller appreciation include: reformulating statements, providing moral support, asking about coping strategies, suggesting problem solving techniques, asking callers to call back if needed, counselors being sincerely interested in them, and counselors disclosing personal information. Callers often rejected suggestions but generally appreciated the calls.
Conclusions:**** We make 14 recommendations about better helping frequent callers. These include: being more warm and empathic, developing individual care plans, respecting callers who do not desire to discuss solutions, more consistent suicide risk assessments, learning interaction techniques for people with cognitive impairments and those in pain, allowing continued follow-up with the same counselor.

10:30 am - 12:00 pm

Late-Breaking Abstracts I

10:30 The impact of Covid 19 on students in Norway – Could an app be useful
Lars Lien, Oslo, Norway

10:45 Suicide rates amongst individuals from ethnic minority backgrounds: A systematic review and meta-analysis
M. Isabela Troya, Cork, Ireland

11:00 Help-Seeking attitudes, alcohol use and suicidality in lithuanian men’s general and military populations
Egle Mazulyte-Rasytine, Vilnius, Lithuania

11:15 Cultural connection and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth suicide mortality rates:
Informing preventative strategies
Mandy Gibson, Griffith, Australia

11:30 RCT of app-based intervention for workplaces
Anthony D. LaMontagne, Deakin, Australia

11:45 Discussion

10:00 am - 12:00 pm

Symposium: Suicide prevention in the context of euthanasia and physician assisted-suicide (SIG Suicide in Older Adults, part 1)

Meeting #1 of the Special Interest Group on Suicide in Older Adults

In the line of fire - Suicide prevention in the debate on legalization of assisted suicide in Germany
Lindner R.1,2
1Institute of Social Work, University of Kassel, Kassel, Germany; 2National Suicide Prevention Programme for Germany (NaSPro), Kassel, Germany

Legalizing assisted dying for older adults who are not seriously ill: the risk of ageism
Van Wijngaarden E.J.
Department of Anesthesiology, Pain and Palliative Medicine, Radboudumc, Nijmegen, the Netherlands

The experience of adults bereaved by the suicide of an older relative
Michaud Dumont G.1,2, Lapierre S.1,2, Viau-Quesnel C.1
1Laboratoire interdisciplinaire de recherche en gérontologie, Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières, Trois-Rivières, Canada; 2Centre for Research and Intervention on Suicide, Ethical Issues and End-of-life Practices, Université du Québec à Montréal, Montréal, Canada

Swiss older adults’ perceptions of end-of-life issues
Castelli Dransart D.A.1, Maggiori C.1, Lapierre S.2, Voélin S.3
1School of Social Work, HES-SO University of Applied Sciences Western Switzerland, Fribourg, Switzerland; 2Dept. of Psychology, University of Quebec, Trois Rivieres, Canada; 3School of Social Work, HES-SO University of Applied Sciences Western Switzerland, Geneva, Switzerland

Future research on older adults’ attitude toward or request for euthanasia and assisted-suicide
Lapierre S.1, Castelli Dransart D.A.2, Erlangsen A.3, Canetto S.S.4, Heisel M.5, Lindner R.6, Scocco P.7 and members of the Special Interest Group
1Department of psychology, Universite du Quebec, Trois-Rivieres, Canada; 2School of Social Work, HES-SO University of Applied Sciences Western Switzerland, Fribourg, Switzerland; 3Danish Research Institute for Suicide Prevention, Copenhagen, Denmark; 4Department of Psychology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, USA; 5Department of Psychiatry, Western University, London, Canada; 6Institute of Social Work, University Kassel, Kassel, Germany; 7ULSS-6 Euganea, Padova, Italy.

LUNCH

AFTERNOON SESSIONS

1:00 pm - 4:00 pm

COVID: International COVID-19 Suicide Prevention Research Collaboration – latest data, clinical interventions and future steps

Aims:
Share learning (so far) about the incidence and prevention of suicide and suicidal behaviours during the COVID pandemics
Discuss next steps / priorities for the collaboration

Session chairs: David Gunnell/Keith Hawton
Session 1 1.00-2.00 PM: What we’ve learnt about suicide and suicidal behaviour during pandemics

Impact of COVID on suicide rates (Prof Jane Pirkis) (8 mins)
Methodological challenges of modelling the impact of pandemic on suicide (Prof. Matt Spittal, 8 mins)
Impact of COVID on self-harm (community / hospital) (Prof Nav Kapur) (8 mins)
Covid relevant factors influencing hospital attendance for self-harm (Prof Keith Hawton 8 mins)
Experience /Lessons learnt from Low and Middle Income Countries (Prof Thilini Rajapakse / Dr Dee Knipe 8 minutes)
Group Discussion / QA + observations from other countries in audience (20 mins)
Short Break
Session 2: 2.10-3.00 PM What have we learnt about the prevention of suicide and suicidal behaviour during pandemics?

Reflections on ICSPRC’s model of suicide prevention actions (Lancet Psychiatry 2020) and comments on what was done well / what we’ve learnt (Prof Ann John) (8 mins)
IASP and future planning responses to future international PH Emergencies (Prof Steve Platt) (8 mins)
Published findings evaluating suicide prevention interventions (public health / clinical) during the pandemic (Prof David Gunnell) (8 mins)
Group Discussion – 25 minutes – group experiences of national / local prevention e.g. alcohol restriction policies / experiences of remote consulting / economic supports / working with the media / low income country experiences – Recommendations for a future emergency (30 mins)
Short Break
Session 3 3.10-3.50 Next steps: research priorities and future direction for ICSPRC
The future research agenda (Prof Thomas Niederkrotenthaler) (8 mins + 10 minutes Q&A)
Panel /group Discussion ICSPRC – what went well / what more could we have done / resourcing / next steps for collaboration (Prof Ella Arensman (from 3.15) /Prof Thomas Niederkrotenthaler /Prof David Gunnell) (20 mins)

1:00 pm - 2:00 pm

Late-Breaking Abstracts II

Forms of suicidal ideation and suicide attempts in childhood over three years
Dr. Ana Ortin Peralta, Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology, Yeshiva University, United States

Perceived experiences with mental health care of Dutch adolescents who died by suicide
Dr. Diana Van Bergen, the University of Groningen, Netherlands

"Medicine use before suicide: a case series study using administrative and coronial data.2
Dr. Kate Chitty, The University of Sydney, Australia

Revisiting evidence of primary prevention of suicide among adult populations: A systematic overview
Ms. Camila Siebert, Altavini University of São Paulo/ University of Brasília, Brazil

Suicidal prevention strategies to reduce attempt repetition risk: Results from a meta-analysis
Dr. Alejandro de la Torre-Luque, Complutense University of Madrid, Spain

1:00 pm - 2:30 pm

Problem-solving therapy for suicidal people in the digital age

Problem solving therapy for suicidal people in the digital age
Dr. Simon Hatcher
Department of Psychiatry, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa, Canada

Learning objectives:

By the end of this workshop:

  1. Participants will have a basic knowledge of the steps of problem-solving therapy.
  2. Participants will understand how to use problem solving therapy when working with people who have presented to hospital with intentional self-harm.
  3. Participants will be able to explore the advantages and disadvantages of using a blended problem-solving therapy that combines face to face therapy supplemented by an electronic case management system (patient facing app and clinician facing dashboard)

Problem solving therapy has been recommended in NICE guidelines on the longer-term management of self-harm and in the Cochrane Review on Psychosocial interventions for adults who self-harm. Problem solving therapy aims to teach a cognitive skill of problem solving over the course of six to eight sessions. It makes sense to patients and clinicians as it directly addresses the fact that by the time people present to hospital with self-harm they have usually run out of effective ways of solving their problems. Training in problem solving therapy is often hard to access and this workshop is an opportunity to gain an understanding of the intervention.

Dr. Hatcher and his team have designed a treatment programme and provided problem solving therapy for people who presented to the emergency departments of major hospitals in New Zealand and Canada following an episode of self-harm. Our results from these large-scale randomised controlled trials have indicated that PST resulted in reductions in hopelessness, suicidal thinking and depression, and improvements in problem solving abilities among people who received the therapy. There was also evidence that it decreased recurrence of self-harm in those who presented two or more times.

The workshop will be an experiential learning experience where participants will use their own problems (these do not require any intimate personal revelations) to gain a basic understanding of problem-solving therapy. This will be supplemented by online and hard copy materials. Participants will also be able to explore and discuss an ongoing trial of blended problem-solving therapy that combines face to face therapy supplemented by an electronic case management system (patient facing app and clinician facing dashboard).

1:00 pm - 2:30 pm

Successes, challenges, and early results of Zero Suicide implementation in three countries

Zero Suicide (ZS) Implementation is underway in communities and health systems throughout the world. Although relatively straightforward in its design, application of the ZS framework in diverse populations and health systems requires an iterative process whereby challenges are navigated to ensure successful outcomes. This symposium will highlight successes, challenges, and early results of ZS implementation projects from three countries – the United States of America, Australia, and Canada. Additionally, the symposium will provide an overview of recently and currently funded research examining ZS, emphasizing different populations, contexts, and settings where research is underway.

Dr. Brian Ahmedani (Presenter), Director of the Center for Health Policy & Health Services Research at Henry Ford Health System, will describe challenges and solutions in a research study that evaluates ZS implementation across 6 Mental Health Research Network affiliated learning healthcare systems in 6 US states servicing more than 9 million patients per year.

Ms. Susan Murray (Presenter), Director of Zero Suicide Institute of Australasia, will review the ZS programming of New South Wales, with specific attention drawn to the use of Theory of Change and a supportive Theory of Action to inform implementation strategies that increase likelihood of success.

Dr. Ian Dawe (Presenter), Associate Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Toronto and Program Chief and Medical Director of Mental Health at Trillium Health Partners, will review challenges and successes of a ZS project (Project Now) in Peel, Canada, that involves expansion of the ZS framework from within a hospital network to community agencies and into schools in a wraparound regional approach.

Dr. Stephen O’Connor (Chair and Presenter), Chief of the Suicide Prevention Research Program in the Division of Services and Intervention Research at the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), will describe NIMH investments in research pertaining to different elements of ZS, including projects focused on training, risk identification, engagement, intervention, and care transitions. He will also offer remarks on each presentation.

1:00 pm - 2:30 pm

Building a strong, healthy workplace in Europe: psychological perspectives and insights from H2020-funded Sister Projects (code 34)

Chair: Arensman, E.

High levels of work-related stress, which has been linked to severe, negative psychological outcomes This has been further compounded by the mental health impacts of COVID-19. Depression and anxiety are the most prevalent mental health difficulties in the EU, causing immense suffering and costing the global economy EUR 1 trillion each year in lost productivity. There is a strong association between depression and suicidal behaviour (suicide and self-harm), which is compounded by comorbidities, including anxiety and stress-related mental and physical health symptoms. . Supportive workplace environments have been linked to lower levels of job dissatisfaction, burnout, and depression.
The European Commission has, under the H2020-2018-2020 work programme “Health, demographic change and well-being”, launched a specific call for proposals entitled “Better health and care, economic growth and sustainable health systems” to fund European projects that aim to develop a psychologically healthy working environment, create a supportive environment, recognise the potential of the workplace in sustainably promoting the mental health and well-being of employees and reduce the negative impacts of work-related stress. Mental health promotion has been shown to be linked with suicide prevention.
Three EU-funded projects, MENTUPP, EMPOWER, and MINDBOT, will share insights into the development of their mental health interventions to promote psychologically healthy working environments. The MENTUPP: Mental Health Promotion and Intervention in Occupational Settings intervention aims to improve mental health and wellbeing and reduce depression, anxiety, and suicidal behaviour and involves the development, implementation, and evaluation of a multilevel intervention with a specific focus on SMEs. The European Platform to Promote Wellbeing and Health in the workplace (EMPOWER) aims to reduce the impact of mental health at the workplace with the development of a novel and low-cost eHealth platform to address mental health in the workplace from a multi-modal perspective. MindBot aims at identifying methods and implementing solutions for promoting good mental health in the emerging industry within the specific context of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) that adopt collaborative robots (cobots) in their production lines. In addition, outcomes of the MENTUPP Pilot Study will also be presented.

1:00 am - 2:30 am

Meaning-Centered groups for middle-aged and older adults: an upstream program to enhance psychological resiliency

Middle-aged and older adults have high rates of suicide, and the older adult population is growing rapidly. Shifting population demographics have contributed to the increasing burden of suicide in North America. Whereas global suicide rates have declined by 36% between 2000 and 2019, it increased by 17% in the Americas (WHO, 2021); during this period, in Canada, there was an 11% increase in deaths by suicide across the life course but a 60% increase in those over the age of 65 (Statistics Canada). Evidence-based approaches are needed for promoting psychological resiliency in order to help prevent the onset or worsening of suicide risk in the potentially vulnerable (e.g., Heisel & Duberstein, 2016; Lapierre et al., 2011).

This workshop will provide theoretical and empirical rationales for Meaning-Centered upstream intervention groups designed to promote psychological resiliency and reduce suicide risk in potentially vulnerable populations. These groups were developed based on the tenets of Viktor Frankl's existential psychotherapy, findings supporting meaning-centered interventions in reducing the wish to die (e.g., Breitbart et al., 2015; Lapierre et al., 2007), and positive associations between Meaning in Life and psychological well-being and negative associations with depression, hopelessness, and suicide ideation (e.g., Heisel & Flett, 2016).

Meaning-Centered Men’s Groups (MCMG) are 12-session community-based intervention groups designed to prevent the onset of depression and suicide risk among middle-aged and older men facing retirement. Group members reported camaraderie and social support, and experienced increased psychological well-being, and significant reduction in depression, hopelessness, and suicide ideation (Heisel et al., 2018, 2020). With new project funding, we are adapting MCMG for two additional demographics: 1. Older Retirement Home residents experiencing pandemic-related social isolation &/or psychological distress (Online Meaning-centered Groups or OMG); 2. Male military veterans and public safety personnel, 50 and older, experiencing a major career transition (including release/retirement; MCMG for Veterans and First-Responders).

This interactive workshop will focus on the impact of life transitions on one’s perception of meaning in life and potential contribution to psychological distress, approaches to engaging at-risk individuals in community-based in-person and virtual/online psychological interventions, and experiential exercises for those interested in delivering meaning-centered groups.

Learning Outcomes:
By the end of this interactive workshop, participants will be able to:

  1. Discuss theory, research, and practice demonstrating the role of Meaning in Life in promoting mental health and well-being and preventing or reducing risk for suicide;
  2. Critically evaluate findings from studies of meaning-centered intervention groups for at-risk demographics; and
    Demonstrate familiarity with the content, process, and approaches involved in facilitating meaning-centered intervention groups.
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm

Media and suicide prevention (SIG)

This is a network meeting of the IASP Special Interest Group on Media and Suicide Prevention. There will be short presentations including some discussion and networking. The meeting is open for all and non-members are very welcome.

2:00 pm - 4:00 pm

Symposium: Clinical and epidemiological studies on suicidal behavior in older adults (SIG Suicide in Older Adults, part 2)

Meeting #1 of the Special Interest Group on Suicide in Older Adults

Clinical characteristics of older, middle-aged and young adults with suicide attempts at psychiatric emergency departments
Wiktorsson S.1,2, Strömsten L.3, Renberg E.S.3, Runeson B.4, Waern M.1,2
1Department of Psychiatry, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; 2Region Västra Götaland, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Psychosis Clinic, Gothenburg, Sweden; 3Department of Clinical Sciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; 4Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Centre for Psychiatry Research, Karolinska Institute, and Stockholm Health Care Services, Region Stockholm, Sweden.

Recent epidemiological findings from Sahlgrenska Suicide Studies in Göteborg, Sweden
Waern M.1,2, Jonson M.1,3, Hedna K.1
1 Department of Psychiatry, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden; 2Psychosis Clinic, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden; 3Affective Clinic, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.

Distinct pathways to late-life suicidal behavior: Difference between early-onset and late-onset attempters
Szanto K.a, Galfalvy H.bc, Gujral S.a, Saplicki C.d, Berry A.d
aUniversity of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; bColumbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Department of Psychiatry, New York, NY, USA; cNew York State Psychiatric Institute, Department of Molecular Imaging and Neuropathology, New York, NY, USA; dSouthern Methodist University, Dallas, TX,USA

A mobile intervention for suicide prevention in aging adults hospitalized for suicidality.
Kiosses D.N.1, Czaja S.2, Banerjee S.2, Putrino D.3
1Psychiatry Department, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, USA; 2Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, USA; 3Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Mount Sinai, New York, NY

Psychosocial interventions for depressed aging adults after a suicide-related hospitalization.
Kiosses D.N.1
1Psychiatry Department, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, USA.

Older adult women and men’s attitudes and experiences of suicidality in Sweden: A phenomenological perspective
Hed S.1,2, Wiktorsson S.1,3 Berg A.2,4, Canetto S.S.5, Waern M.1,3
1Department of Psychiatry, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, University of Gothenburg, Sweden; 2Older Adult Psychiatric Clinic, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden; 3Psychosis Clinic, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden; 4Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Sweden; 5Department of Psychology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA.

2:30 pm - 4:00 pm

How to Impact Middle-Aged Population by Implementing a Workplace Suicide Prevention Strategy: International Perspectives

Organizer/Chair: Ping Qin1, James Hill2, Sally Spencer-Thomas3

1 National Centre for Suicide Research and Prevention, University of Oslo, Norway; 2 Mental Health Advocate, Energy Queensland, Australia; 3 Psychologist and Impact Entrepreneur; President, United Suicide Survivors International

Globally over 700,000 people die by suicide every year, and over 80% of them are of middle aged and in the working population. In fact, in some countries the suicide rate peaks in the middle age years. On one hand, socioeconomic difficulties and workplace stress and transitions (e.g., unemployment) can contribute to employee distress and suicidal despair. On the other hand, the purpose and community a workplace brings can also be buffers for suicidal behaviours.

The workplace, then is arguably the most crosscutting system we have for suicide prevention, and yet workplaces are largely under-prepared for their role in suicide prevention, intervention and postvention. For instance, the workplace’s opportunity in being a bridge to support resources is often underleveraged through the benefit of a largely underutilized Employee Assistance Program. While the workplace’s role in suicide prevention may be new for many industries, construction and energy are industries that have been involved in implementation longer than most.

In this workshop jointly organized by the IASP Special Interest Group of Suicide and Self-harm in Middle-aged Adults and Special Interest Group of Suicide and the Workplace, the facilitators will share data, tools and insights on which factors contributing to suicide risk in the working population of young and middle ages, and how to engage workplaces, unions, and professional associations in a public health approach of suicide prevention. Small group discussions and action planning will help participants gain takeaway approaches to help their communities. Case studies from MATES Construction Return on Investment (ROI) studies and MATES in Energy will demonstrate how program implementation works and how impact is measured. Facilitators will bring perspectives from three different continents, research and lived experience, and program development.

Three learning objectives:

  1. To describe the risk factors for suicide in middle-aged and in working population
  2. To list nine practices and eight guiding principles that guide a workplace suicide prevention strategy
  3. To identify key lessons learned when implementing programs in industries and organizations.
2:30 pm - 4:00 pm

Community based interventions - suicidal behaviour prevention

By Ulrich Hegerl, Ella Arensman, Daniel Rock, Meike Baretta

Completed and attempted suicides are ever present challenges in global public health. Nearly 800,000 people die from suicide every year and the number of attempted suicides is estimated to be around 20 times higher. Most suicides occur in the context of psychiatric disorders, depression being by far the most important one. A variety of factors such as misconceptions about depression, stigma related to mental disorders, underdiagnosis at the primary care level, a lack of specialised care for suicidal persons or access to lethal means, all contribute to the high rates of attempted and completed suicides. Therefore, multilevel and community based interventions are most promising and have the best evidence base to be efficient in preventing suicidal behaviour.

The 4-level intervention concept of the European Alliance Against Depression (EAAD) targets both depression and prevention of suicidal behavior. It has already been implemented in 120 regions in- and outside of Europe. Within this concept, local alliances of relevant stakeholders are built, and activities are started simultaneously, addressing 1) primary care professionals, 2) the general public, 3) community facilitators and gatekeepers (clergy, caregivers, police, journalists, teacher, pharmacists), and 4) patients and their relatives. A broad catalogue of intervention materials is available in many languages, comprising digital self-management tools (iFightDepression-tool) educational workshop packages and professional awareness campaign materials. The 4-level intervention concept and the iFightDepression self-management tool were voted as “Best Practice” by representatives of the European Union Member States in 2019 and are presently being transferred to several new European countries within the EU-funded project EAAD-Best.

This symposium will share and address best practice examples, evidence for efficacy and concrete implementation experiences concerning community-based interventions targeting depression and suicidal behaviour. Aspects such as i) transfer and implementation of the 4-level intervention concept (Hegerl U); ii) application within the context of an existing national suicide prevention strategy and the resulting 'win-win' situation from an implementation research perspective (Arensman E); iii) further activities in Australia (Rock D); iv) and the Netherlands (Baretta M) will be presented.

2:30 pm - 4:00 pm

Understanding and predicting suicidal ideation and behavior using innovative empirical approaches

Organizer/Chair: Prof. Dr. Thomas Forkmann, University of Duisburg-Essen/Germany, Department of Clinical Psychology,

Co-Chair: Prof. Dr. Heide Glaesmer, University of Leipzig/Germany, Department of Medical Psychology and Medical Sociology

Although the prevention of suicide attempts and suicides is among the major goals of international and national public health plans, it remains challenging. The valid prediction of suicidal thoughts and behaviors (STBs) is crucial for improving our understanding of suicidal developments, including acute suicidal crises. This symposium will present four talks on innovative research projects that apply different methodological approaches in order to improve our ability to predict suicidality.
Thomas Forkmann will present the study protocol and first results of an ongoing multicenter study that prospectively examines acute risk factors for suicidal ideation and behavior after discharge from inpatient psychiatric treatment using ecological momentary assessments (EMA) and passive monitoring. Lena Spangenberg’s talk will be about efforts on phenotyping suicidal thinking and behavior. Juliane Brüdern will present results from an ongoing study that aims at measuring a suicide-specific attentional bias with a modified version of the Suicide Stroop Task in patients with acute suicidality and at investigating its associations with depression, hopelessness and suicidal thoughts. Finally, Inken Höller will present results from a study that compared networks of depressive symptoms and suicide risk factors assessed with EMA in outpatients before and after cognitive behavioral therapy.

List of presentations

Forkmann, T., Glaesmer, H., Plein, L., Lucht, L., Schönfelder, A., Spangenberg, L. Acute risk factors for suicidal ideation and behaviour after discharge from inpatient treatment: the APOS-project

Spangenberg, L., Friedrich, M., Forkmann, T., Hallensleben, N., Schönfelder, A., Rath, D., Paashaus, L., Teismann, T., Glaesmer, H.1. Phenotyping suicidal thinking and behavior – Do suicidal subtypes differ in clinical characteristics and future suicide attempts?

Brüdern, J., Glaesmer, H. Behavioral measures of suicide risk: The Suicide Stroop Task

Höller, I., Rath, D., Wichelhaus, E., Forkmann, T. Networks of depressive symptoms and suicide risk factors before and after CBT

2:30 pm - 4:00 pm

Brief therapy ASSIP: Brief therapy for patients with suicidal behavior

ATTEMPTED SUICIDE SHORT INTEVENTION PROGRAM

Gysin-Maillart, A. 1, 2, 3
1Translational Research Centre, University Hospital of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy,
University of Bern, 2Switzerland, 2Unit for Clinical Suicide Research, Department of Clinical
Sciences, Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Lund University, Sweden, 3University of Leipzig
Department of Medical Psychology and Medical Sociology, Germany

Suicide may appear as an option to escape from a subjectively unbearable life situation and may repeatedly emerge throughout life as a possible coping strategy when major life or identity goals are seriously threatened. Treatment of this high-risk group is challenging. The Attempted Suicide Short Intervention Program (ASSIP) is a three to four session brief therapy with an ongoing contact by semi-standardized letters, and has been found to be efficacious in reducing suicidal behavior. The brief intervention ASSIP emphasizes an early collaborative therapeutic alliance with the suicidal patient with the aim to reach a shared understanding of the suicidal crisis in a life-career (biographical) context. Meaningful preventive measures can then be developed. ASSIP is offered to suicide attempters in addition to treatment as usual and does not replace a long-term treatment.
This workshop will introduce the main theoretical concepts and the practice of the brief therapy ASSIP. Workshop participants will be walked through the five ASSIP elements sessions step-by step. Video examples, role-play, and case discussions will be provided.

2:30 pm - 4:00 pm

Suicidal behaviour in youth: risk factors, assessment and prevention

Sarchiapone M.1, Olie E.2, Balazs J.3, Apter A.4, Barzilay S.4, Hoven C. 5
1Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Molise, Campobasso, Italy; 2Department of Emergency Psychiatry and Acute Care, Lapeyronie Hospital, CHU Montpellier, Montpellier, France; 3Department of Developmental and Clinical Child Psychology, Institute of Psychology, Eotvos Lorand University, Budapest, Hungary; 4Schneider Children's Medical Centre of Israel, Petach Tikvah, Israel; 5Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, United States

According to the World Health Organization estimates, suicide is the fourth leading cause of death in young people aged 15 to -19 years old, thus representing a serious public health issue. In this symposium, promoted by the EPA Section on Suicide and Suicide Prevention, several findings will be presented about suicide risk, assessment and prevention among adolescents. Judit Balazs will discuss the role of perfectionism as a risk factor for self-injurious behaviours. Marco Sarchiapone will review epidemiological findings on suicidal behaviour among adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Alan Apter will present the results of a study on the use of Ecological Momentary Assessment in high-risk suicidal adolescents. Finally, Christina Hoven will discuss the findings of a longitudinal study on suicide risk factors and prevention conducted in Guyana, one of the countries with the highest suicide rates worldwide.

Chair: Sarchiapone M.,
Co-Chair: Olie E.
Presenters:

  1. Balazs J.: Self-injury and perfectionism
  2. Sarchiapone M.: Suicidal behaviour among adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder
  3. Apter A., Barzilay S.: Feasibility and acceptability of longitudinal passive and active digital monitoring in high-risk suicidal adolescents
  4. Hoven C.: Youth suicide prevention in Guyana

AFTERNOON COFFEE BREAK

Opening Session

Welcome Reception

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